What PR Can Do For You

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What PR Can Do For You

Published May 18, 2021

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This episode we are with Jourdann who is with Electrify PR. I got connected with her through another great Facebook group that I’m in. I want to shout this one out. It’s called PR Czars. I had heard about it years ago. It’s a Facebook group that I paid to be in. I know WIIM is one of those as well. It’s pretty invaluable. It’s a great Facebook community of PR professionals. If you haven’t heard of it, definitely check it out. I was connected with her because I was looking for somebody who does PR, but has a real grasp on the influencer marketing space, right.

So Jourdann and I connected. And I’ve since referred her to some other people who have also been super pleased with her work and her really solid understanding of the influencer space and the nuances of it. One cool thing that I do want to mention is that she is offering our members of WIIM collective, a special promotion. So this has been on our site for months. So this isn’t new to this conversation. But I was just wanted to like draw your attention to it. So if you go on our website iamwiim.com. And you log in, go to the top picks section and she is listed there as one of our under the PR section. And she’s absolutely one of my top picks. And she’s even providing a promotion for our collective members. So definitely check that out the link to that, I’ll just drop it in the show notes. So you can just go directly there but remember, in order to see the promotion, you do have to be a member of the collective. So just login, and you’ll be able to see it right away. So she doesn’t need to be offering discounts. She does. And she just really thinks the group is badass. And I think she’s a badass. So I was really excited to have her join the conversation today.

Jessy Grossman:
Alright guys enjoy this episode. Introduce yourself to everybody tell everyone a little bit about you and about the work that you that you do.

Jourdann Lubliner:
Thanks so much for having me. I’m Jourdann, I’m the founder and CEO of Electrify PR. And I appreciate you all taking the time to listen to me today. And Jessy for having me on. So Electrify PR is a jack of all trades. You know, we’re a public relations, influencer marketing and really a brand building, agency and consultancy, you know, work mostly working with dynamic startups, and, you know, companies that are really innovating and doing cool things that are impacting the world and impacting, you know, how we live our lives. I got my background, working in the agency space, and then moved in house but you know, I’ve worked with brands ranging from Timex to men’s health to gilt groupe, and I, you know, luckily, I’ve had a good sort of, you know, 11 years of experience in different verticals, and kind of been able to see how the industry has evolved and shifted and adapted to that. So anyway, thanks again, Jessy and looking forward to our conversation.

Jessy Grossman:
What a good preview. And thank you for that. So let’s just dive into it. I’ve got so many questions to like, let’s just jump into it. So I want to talk briefly, let’s just sort of like common PR misconceptions, because I feel like it’s important for everybody to sort of like, wrap their head around that. My first question for you is, what do you think should be the goal of hiring a PR professional in the first place?

Jourdann Lubliner:
Yeah, that’s that’s a great intro. You know, I think I’ll start off with that question. And, you know, I think one of the biggest misconceptions is that PR will immediately impact sales. And the bigger KPI is really exposure and positioning your brand in terms of messaging, because eventually, you know, if the campaign does well, and if you have a good relationship with your PR agency, sales should come in organically, but it isn’t necessarily the number one goal because that is more of an advertising play. So you know, it’s important to understand that going in, because you want to be able to really see the value as a couple of different goals. Number one, again, getting your brand out there, getting people talking about it, getting people posting about it on social, getting people excited about it. And you know, one of the biggest ways to achieve that is not just hiring a PR firm and expecting magic to happen. It’s a two way street. And I think that’s another misconception that people might have is, you know, I’m going to hire a PR firm, and all of a sudden, I’m going to be in the New York Times tomorrow. It’s a longer term play, and one that requires kind of a back and forth, and a two part relationship, where you’re really working together, actually, in tandem to kind of come up with a strategy, look at what else is happening in the world and how your brand fits into that, and also how it’s innovating, and then to deploy that strategy to the media. but you know, I think you people have to, that are getting into the PR should understand that it’s not going to happen overnight. And that if you’re successful, you should see sales, but that’s not the number one goal.

Jessy Grossman:
Can the number one goal be different for each business? Or like how would you describe what that number one goal generally is?

Jourdann Lubliner:
Yeah, and I think your total, that’s actually a really good point. It’s definitely unique to different businesses, you know, some really, you know, if they have an app, they really want to drive app downloads, other people, they want people to kind of just be more aware of their brand. Some people have a specific event they’re throwing sooner a big launch but it…yeah, I think that’s another thing about hiring a PR professional is kind of going in to have that conversation from the get go so that they PR agency can work with you to come up with a plan that aligns with that specific goal. And you know, it’s definitely different sometimes PR for the client.

Jessy Grossman:
So okay, an entrepreneur, let’s create a scenario. An entrepreneur hires you tomorrow. What should they expect and what shouldn’t they expect?

Jourdann Lubliner:
Yeah, so the way it typically works is, you know, I always have kind of a kickoff call first, I just have an initial call to really see what their as you mentioned, what their goals are, what they’re looking to get out of the PR relationship and what they have coming up, you know. In terms of Do they have new product launches? Are they working with a celebrity? Do they have a partnership coming up? Or is that something that they want to work with a PR professional to devise a strategy against, and brainstorm. And, you know, once we kind of discuss what the partnership will look like, we, you know, get on a kickoff call and kind of, it’s almost like an information dump. And that’s another important piece of the equation, you know, it might seem like, you know, could be annoying to overload the PR person with information, but it’s super helpful, that this Pr Pr professional is basically like an in house member of your team, the more that I would say, the company can treat a PR agency or publicist, as a member of their team, the better off it will be because they want to know as much as they can about the company, the company’s mission, the company’s goals, how the company operates, what’s the culture like, because that only helps them kind of tell the story to the media, because you want to make sure they’re crystal clear on that verbiage and how to create messaging that and pitching, you know, how are they going to kind of position the brand in the best way possible.

Jourdann Lubliner:
Yeah, I mean, look, I think it’s just about practice. You know, I I’ve dealt with clients that are very nervous about doing TV and podcasts and things like that and others that love it and and sort of really welcome that and I think it’s just practice because… we’re actually at a It’s a unique time right now that a lot of these are virtual opportunities, meaning there’s a little less of the flashing lights blinding you in this TV studios, and so it’s a little it’s a little easier to enter that space it this time. But you know, I think you know, as long as you are working, if you’re working with a PR person, they’ll usually they can help you if you’re nervous and kind of guide you and practice, practice, run, if needed. But it all depends on the client and who it is because some people are kind of already in equipped and know their stuff and don’t need that kind of prep others have never done it before and, you know, that’s definitely service I offer. And many publicists do have sort of practicing for these opportunities and making sure they’re, you know, feeling good about it.

Jessy Grossman:
Yeah. And I think that like, when I think of what type of work it encompasses, like it is, it’s so much about the story that you’re looking to tell. So like, what is your process look like for strategizing about, you know, the different stories to tell when, to tell it to like who to tell it to like, what does that process look like behind the scenes?

Jourdann Lubliner:
And you know, I think and that sort of goes into our next seven ingredients for success, but I think we can kind of get started on that. I think one of the things I wanted to chat about today is there are a couple of different pillars. Now it’s not a it’s certainly not a one size fits all, I’m not saying that if you get one of these things, you’re gonna get PR but there are certain ingredients, I think for PR success that I’ve kind of learned have been more successful. So to get started, I this is not necessarily super unique, but access to celebrities and notable talent. Whether that is it doesn’t even only have to be a celebrity. But you know, one of my favorite clients of shine talent group. We work together, we’ve worked been working together on the BodCon which is the first ever virtual body confidence conference. And one of the reasons I think we were able to get such great press, landing 24 placements, including Forbes, he online people, etc is because the conference cultivated a really great diverse group of talent ranging from celebrities such as hunter McGrady, and jameela, Jamil, but also actually just people doing really great things in the body competence space, that are influencers. And we were able to leverage them for interviews, which really got the message across the BodCon in a more organic way. I think, than just saying we’re doing a conference and you should go. Like we were able to get exclusive quotes via these interviews to each outlet and outlets love exclusives. So that’s another thing like media outlets want exclusive content. They don’t just want to feature although the press release, quote can get them interested. Ideally, they like to have their own content. So it’s really great to leverage that. And that’s a tactic that is any startup, if you’re thinking about PR, you know, think about who you can tap and leverage. Do you have a really cool investor that’s been investing in other great startups? Do you have you know, if you’re in wellness? Is there a nutritionist that you can tap to be a spokesperson, if you’re in fitness? can you leverage your the trainers that are part of your fitness startup, if you’re in fashion, you know, is one of the designers did they have an interesting story. So it’s it’s a lot about thinking about human interests. You know, it’s not just product product, product, promotion, promotion, or ownership people want in emotion, emotion over promotion. I just made that up, but it’s kind of good. Yeah, so you know, you want to think of like, as a journalist, they’re getting bombarded with hundreds of pitches a day, what’s actually what it’s called service journalism. So like, what service are they offering to the reader, you know, are their advice and tips and tricks are there? You know, is there a human interest story? And so, I think that that’s just an important tactic is like looking at the people that make up the brand, the people involved in the brand and anyone you can tap externally to help that maybe be a little sexier. Um, so yeah, that’s one piece in it, and I can continue.

Jessy Grossman:
Yeah. no, that’s so interesting. And I mean, look, we’re in the influence, like, we’re in the influencer space. Right? So, I mean, one thing that I appreciate about you is that like, you don’t just approach this work from like a, as being a generalist in a generalist publicist, like I know that you have specific experience, and were with all the influencer space in particular. And I think like, a, I’m all about, like, any business person who’s gonna sort of like niche down, I just think it’s really a smart decision to do for your own business. But relevant to Wim and the people that are listening in right now, of course, like they’re all in the influencer space. So like, you know, ingredients for PR success. Does that look different in the influencer space at all? Or is that are they pretty much the same?

Jourdann Lubliner:
Yeah, and I think in the you know, influencer space, so I, you know, do influencer marketing for, to my clients in the sense of booking, you know, contracting influencers, to, you know, bring life to two different brands. Um, but, you know, if you’re an influencer marketing agency looking for PR, I think it’s a little bit more of a business play, unless you have, you’re doing kind of consumer facing, like events, conferences, and partnerships, like the BodCon, but there’s also the expertise element. And this is sort of applicable in multiple different industries. So, you know, it’s sort of like, expert commentary is a way to explain it. And that means, again, in a lot of these articles, they want commentary, meaning quotes from people on whatever topic they’re writing about to substantiate their claims, these journalists. So if you’re writing a story on, you know, different happenings in the social media space, like Instagram, hiding their likes, or, you know, what’s been happening with Clubhouse, introducing a tipping feature, for example, if you can position the CEO or the co founders or, you know, as experts in that space, you can garner press via interviews, or just submitting email commentary on happenings. So that’s a great way to kind of showcase thought leadership. Another way is, you know, in this is a play I do sometimes can help if you have, I think, a really unique perspective, op eds, you can submit an op ed to different publications. And the other thing is TV, you know, similar to the sort of expert commentary that opportunities could lead to business shows like chatter, Yahoo Finance, sometimes have people on to talk about larger events happening. So one of the important things is, in any PR professional is to always keep, you know, know what, what is happening in the world. Look at the news all the time, like, if you see a hot topic or something new happening, you know, you have to be on the ball. So you can try to position your client to tech talk about it, or you know, just develop good relationships with the people writing those stories, so that you can say, look, if you ever need Eve, if you ever need commentary, you never need someone to protocol quickly, I’m here and we’re girl. So that’s sort of another piece of it just sort of maintaining that communication with the proper media,

Jessy Grossman:
Like can imagine because a lot of these things that are like news stories, essentially, I can assume like something pops up where some new features launched and like they need a quote, you know, in five minutes, like, or what it feels like, Yeah, right. So it’s really about like, establishing those relationships and knowing that they can rely on you and knowing that, like, you’re just like an expert. So yeah, I love that. I think that’s so it’s just so relevant. And so what if you are somebody who wants to get into those things, but maybe doesn’t feel qualified or is having like imposter syndrome? Or you know, just like very real things like what do you suggest to some clients that maybe they see the benefits of PR but they’re a little bit gun shy about doing it for themselves?

Jessy Grossman:
And so, like, Who’s the who is the ideal client for you? Right? Because I feel like you are at a point in your career when you can be somewhat selective. And, you know, I think that you’ve got all these great connections and like, what do you what type of company or person works best with what you have to offer in particular?

Jourdann Lubliner:
I mean, I will say, I’m a bit of a I mean, I a bit of a can do, but I can do a lot, I don’t, I’m not trying to toot my own horn, but like I do, go into different categories, but I love the wellness space personally. However, I have done tech, I’ve done entertainment, you know, retail, kind of done it all. But that’s just, that’s just me, I think as long as any company and any client for me is worthwhile, as long as they’re truly differentiated and doing things that I think, are considered forward thinking to the world. And I know that sounds like a tall ask, it doesn’t have to be like, they’re inventing the next the cure for cancer but, you know, I think there has to be a unique element that sets it apart from other products or services in the space. And I think before a company approaches a PR, professional or agency, they should know what those differentiation points are. Because if they don’t know that my job’s gonna be really hard. Because that’s not news. You know, if you’re doing what everyone else is doing, then how is that news, you know, so. And that’s why, you know, you can try to rely on yourself, perhaps with other brands that are doing cool things to kind of give yourself a little more excitement if needed. But I think peers very similar, I say, to almost like, I’m not a financial expert, but if you’re pitching an investor, you know, it’s or three, even if you’re pitching a retailer pitching, it’s the same, I always ask for those decks. Because usually, people are outlining those elements about their brand in those presentations. And those are important things for PR people to have, you know, we want to know, we want to know what we can sell to the media, essentially, I’m not exactly selling, but you know, like, communicate. So I think that it’s important for companies to go into conversation with PR professional, just really knowing what is unique, and what’s differentiated about what they’re doing. And understand that that’s important for PR success.

Jessy Grossman:
No, no, I appreciate that. I think that like most things in life, it’s a lot about timing. And I think that there’s a premature time to necessarily connect with you. I mean, you want to work as efficiently and you know, as best as possible. So I love that call out. And so for somebody who’s listening in today, and is like, I want to get to that point, where it’s the right time to work with someone and just like Jourdann, what would you suggest that they can do to start today to better set themselves up for PR success?

Jourdann Lubliner:
Yeah, I would say, you know, identify, you know, newness in a sense, like, if you’re a new app, or a new product, or a new brand, that you’re launching, that’s a story. But if you’ve been around, you know, think of like, what can I do to potentially create news and and that’s a conversation you can have also with PR, but, you know, are you trying to enter new retailers? For example, are you… will you be in target soon? Because that’s the story. Are you going to be partnering with another somewhat aligned parallel brand on a capsule collection? Do you have, you know, a conference like CES that you can be a part of where you could use a PR professional to amplify your presence there? are you creating your own conference? Are you you know, for another example, if you’re like a nutrition oriented brand, hiring a nutritionist to speak on topics aligned with your passions, is a great way to get a PR presence. For example, one of my clients fresh bit, which is an AI powered visual diet, diarrhea, meaning it’s kind of a way to track your food in your water at exercise intake started by a Google product manager. And, you know, one of the ways we’ve immediately gotten that app off the map on the map is we I came up with a strategy of hiring a nutritionist who is commenting on articles related to nutrition. And you know, in her title, it’s mentioned, she’s a nutrition counselor for freshmen. So, you know, there are ways to there, there are multiple tent poles, but I would say just try to think outside of the box. And I would say, make sure that you’re not expecting things like too soon, because that’s, you’re not gonna get a ton of PR in just a month, you know, you need to give it a little bit of time. And it’s not to say you’re not going to get it in a month but I, you know, I personally think there’s a lot more value in a longer term engagement with a brand, because then I can kind of uncover new opportunities as the time goes on. But also, you know, kind of make new relationships as the time goes on, come up with new ideas, and kind of it gives the brand more of a chance, I would say to succeed.

Jessy Grossman:
We appreciate that, I think that that’s a really great advice. And like, it’s relationship building, right? as well. So that takes time. And, and I’d love to also talk a little bit about like, an editorial calendar. So I know, you mentioned that it’s something that’s important in this conversation. So tell everybody listening a little bit about editorial calendars, and how they should be thinking about that.

Jourdann Lubliner:
Yeah, so I brought up the editorial calendar, because what that really means is especially relevant for product related brands, um, there is a sort of cycle of gift guides and product round ups that happen every year throughout the year. And one thing I always do is preempt those roundups, because I’ll just kind of give some examples. So starting with the end of the year as a holiday gift guide season, so you’ll notice many round ups and magazine features on holiday gift guides but actually, journalists work on that as early as six months in advance for long lead meaning for magazines for shortly meaning printed, you know, digital, and you know, things that are coming out once a day or weekly, that’s even happening in the fall. So, you know, PR professional, related a company needs to prepare their product kind of line up, to have give that PR professional the information about what’s coming up in the pipeline, so they can communicate that press and then you know, Valentine’s Day, then we have International Women’s Day, then we have Mother’s Day, we have pride coming up. I’m really excited about um, we have, you know, Father’s Day gifts for grads, we also just have the Super Bowl and we have Oscars. So it’s like… it’s also How can your brand align with that, you know, if I don’t, you know, if you’re a fashion brand, it’s a lot different to because I think there’s more seasonality, there’s Fashion Week, you know, you fall in the spring, you have resorts, so that’s a whole other ballgame as well. But the point of the editorial calendar is that as long as you are working with the PR rational to say, How can I, you know, give you the tools to approach the media, because of all these roundups coming up, not to mention sales have become a huge play, meaning Memorial Day sales, Columbus Day sales, Labor Day, there are multiple roundups of sales happening from companies. So it’s important as a company to think work with that person and say, here’s the calendar of what we’re doing. How can you leverage that or we don’t have that calendar yet. What do I need to know as we pump out the product pipeline so that we can secure inclusion potentially, in those roundups.

Jessy Grossman:
I just I so appreciate us talking about this because, I mean, especially the people listening to this conversation, like we mostly think about an editorial calendar in terms of the influencer themselves, right? But like, this whole conversation is about that you are also an influencer in your own right. And that, you know, you deserve that focus as well because like you are also, you know, let’s say your talent manager, you know, your business can get more notoriety and yourself as a thought leader, and all of these really important things to be able to amplify you and your company. And it’s nothing different than what an influencer does in terms of like an editorial calendar. Are there any specific, tight like tools out there that you normally suggest in order to like help facilitate an editorial calendar?

Jourdann Lubliner:
Yeah, so from a long lead standpoint, meaning the magazines, they actually have those available online. And that’s more for advertising purposes, but it actually you can use it for pitching purposes, because they kind of outline the topics of each month. And that’s actually helpful from a digital standpoint, too, because it’s somewhat similar back to school is always going to be the same time. You know, pride is always the same time International, Women’s History Month or international is a Black History Month. And so I think it’s also really important for social tie back to the influencer and social conversation to be, you know, you also want to make sure that you’re kind of pairing up social with PR, because if you are promoting, you know, anything private related, or holiday related, you know, it’s all happening. It’s all happening in tandem, it’s happening online, it’s happening on social tapping, you know, so you want to be as any startup is scrappy, but it’s important to kind of make sure everyone’s communicating about what the campaign’s they’re doing, because you want to make sure that you’re leveraging these timeframes, it always.

Jessy Grossman:
I need to back into those things. I think that a lot of what I’m hearing is about preparing for those moments in time. And so having an editorial calendar to be able to plan for is so key. So I’m glad that that’s one of the topics we got to dive into today because it’s super important and I appreciate you bringing that up. So we also want to dive into another topic, how to get new clients, I think that’s something that is certainly a goal of certain companies that get into working with publicist. That’s definitely a goal. So what are some of the smartest more efficient, more creative, perhaps ways to use PR to get new business?

Jourdann Lubliner:
Yeah, and I think this just goes to say, what I was talking about earlier, which is leveraging your PR, like, not just on social, which is very important to do, but I think, leverage it on your website, leverage, and a lot of people do that. But you know, it’s important to use PR to help your business grow in a sales presentations. When you’re at a conference, you can say as mentioned in x or showcase some of the logos. You know, if you’re talking to investors, it’s a PR, that’s and that sort of ties back to my initial point of it’s not just sales, because it’s really a credibility play, you know, you want to show that you’re not just a nobody, not that you’re not a nobody can get PR, but it kind of turns you into your company into somebody. And that’s because if if media outlets are endorsing, or even just writing about your company, that means that there’s some there’s value that you’re producing in this world. So and another thing is, you know, I would just say, one of the ways I’ve gotten clients to which I find interesting is, you can go to your network, going back to when you were kid, like I have people from high school that I’ve worked with, I have people from summer camp, you know, and that sort of applies to any startup, don’t just think of the current like tap back into your network from way back when and maybe there are people doing really interesting things now that you didn’t realize that could be interesting for your business. Maybe there’s someone doing another startup in the same space that you could network with and learn from or maybe there’s a partnership opportunity or retail opportunity. So just always think of what all of the avenues And I think social media, specially, you know, obviously people that are adapted social media like that your group will know that it helps a lot in growing business. And that is as simple as just trying to, you know, you don’t want to overdo it and kind of you always be posting about yourself and stuff like that. But networking, it’s as simple as a dm these days, it’s as simple as a tweet, it’s LinkedIn, don’t be afraid to just linked in request people that could be beneficial to you, um. Facebook groups like either when group is fantastic. And think of, you know, unique social media Clubhouse is a great way for networking now. So we have these new tools that can kind of make it easier to generate business. And I think, you know, there could also utilize, sometimes there are nice quotes in the articles themselves that can be utilized in these materials, not just the logos. So if they’re, if the article mentions something great, you know, you can leverage that. But I would say, you know, it kind of just my biggest advice, in terms of getting clients and also getting out there is look at all the avenues, not just one, because it’s like, the more kind of spaghetti throw on the wall, the better luck you’ll have in kind of growing your business.

Jessy Grossman:
And like this is so similar to like other circumstances where you just need one or two yeses, right? Like, you you try all of it is some of it is so much a numbers game. And I mean, look, you could you’re preaching to the choir here about networking. So I will always say that, you know, you should utilize your network first and foremost, before trying to connect with people that you don’t know, right, because it just seems like such an easier play in some instances, because those relationships have already begun to be cultivated. And it should be a two way street where you’re each able to leverage each other. And there’s certainly value prop in both directions. So a hundred percent, I love that you said that. And it just sounds like a more creative way to approach it. Like, it isn’t just and I appreciate that, that’s how you are approaching all of this work, it sounds like that, like I’m going to figure out if I could put like two squares together and like a third on top and see what it looks like and do it my way. And, utilize all different avenues in order to get what I want. Another question that I have for you is like, so for those thinking that this sounds like something that they want to invest in, because it is absolutely an investment in their company and themselves. What sort of timeframes are realistic to manage everybody’s expectations? Like, in terms of seeing some results? And then also with Bo, how long of an engagement? Should they can… they should wrap their heads around? Like, how long should that engagement be with you?

Jourdann Lubliner:
Yeah, so I think six months is really the sweet spot, um, you know, because it’s not that you’re not going to get them until six months, you know, I typically can get them within the first and second months. But I think it’s more of a way to, again, have that PR professional be an integral part of your team overall versus just a vendor. Because when you are able to kind of tell that story. From a longer term standpoint, I think a you can uncover more opportunities, but also you build the relationships with the media more. And even if you had those existing media relations with which I do, you know, you’re now working with a different brand. So they want to kind of get more familiar, if you’re an expert providing commentary, you know, they will know that if you provide good commentary and kawana come back to you. And so if you know and again, this editorial calendar, there are multiple touch points throughout the year to activate just based on what’s already happening, and as well as what your company is doing. And you’re I totally understandable some companies want to quote unquote, test it out. But at the end of the day, it’s worthwhile to, you know, have a long term engagement. And it’s not even that long term. I know other other PR firms require a year. But I know that with startups, I think six months is usually kind of a nice way to still get that entrenchment of the PR professional without, you know, it’s sometimes hard to do a full year as a starting emerging company so that that’s understandable.

Jessy Grossman:
Definitely, but like in an ideal situation. Do you think that it’s smartest to have an engagement with a publicist year round as like, a regular part of the team essentially? Or is that something where it’s like, oh, like, let’s like, infuse a little bit in of that into your business, like, once a year? What would like what’s the approach? Like, what’s the cadence?

Jourdann Lubliner:
Yeah, I definitely think if you do a year, that’s even better, because you know, it. Also, if you have media that is familiar with a company, you know, you want to be having these constant conversations. And if you drop off and then come back, it’s not as easy to have that same cadence. So I think it’s Yeah, I would agree with you that six months, two years definitely is good.

Jessy Grossman:
Well, I like a lot of it is just like generating that buzz. Um, I don’t know, I think it’s really an exciting conversation. I feel like a lot of our members, I know how incredible they are, and all the work that they’re doing, and not enough people do. And I feel like as women, it’s an interesting conversation, right? Like, we don’t want to be too loud, too proud to this to that, and there’s like this fear or something that we should be about the like, only about the work. And I transparently, I think that’s bullshit. You know, I think that we should absolutely be selling ourselves all day, every day and have as many people know about the incredible things that you’re doing because, like, that’s part of why you’re doing it. So you can help more people so you can reach more people. And I think it’s important to just keep that in mind. So I’m so appreciative of you coming on today. Thank you so so much. It’s been such a pleasure. So anything you want to leave anyone listening with before we go?

Jourdann Lubliner:
No, I mean, I think this was great conversation. And you know, so appreciative of you doing these amazing Clubhouse chats and podcast episodes and having me on really appreciated and if anyone has any questions, don’t hesitate to email me, it’s gonna be a long thing to spell out. And so I think just shoot me a DM at @electrify_PR and I would love to continue that conversation. And yeah, I mean, open to any questions you might have about PR Following this, and hopefully we’ll make some new connections.

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