Is the NYT Right About Fohr’s AMP

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Is the NYT Right About Fohr’s AMP

Interview With: Grace Murray of Fohr

Published March 23, 2021

Listen to the live podcast version of this story

This is going to be a particularly interesting post. So as a little bit of backstory, we were doing a Clubhouse room about two weeks ago from when this episode is going live called Breaking News in Influencer Marketing. We had a great panel, we always do. We were talking about newsworthy topics from the last week or so. One of the topics was this New York Times article that came out about Fohr, and about one of their newest offerings. There was certainly commentary about all of it and there were questions (and there were pretty strong opinions). That’s what WIIM is most known for: opinionated women. So I love it. I love it all.

Then we had the CEO of Fohr and other members of their team pop into the Clubhouse room. I love a good debate. I love a good discussion. I am completely for transparency in our industry. We’ve got to push each other. So they raised their hand after listening for a few minutes and wanted to come up on stage. And so immediately, I was like, yeah, let’s let’s do this. And they came up on stage.

And we got to briefly speak with James Nord their CEO, we got to speak with Grace Murray, who was also on stage. I thought it would be ideal for them to come on the podcast and chat more in depth about AMP. I know I had a million questions from our members who had questions about it. The influencers who were in that Clubhouse room had questions, and I kept hearing consistently, “I’ve got a lot more questions than answers”.

My goal is really to get to the bottom of what this tool is, and how it can be beneficial and what it can be. And encourage them to make it what I think would benefit the most people. So that being said, Grace has been on our podcast before. She is absolutely lovely as lovely can be. And I was excited to have her on the show. I did invite James on the show as well. My impression actually was that he was going to be on and he wasn’t. So we had Grace and I asked her all the questions that I had and we really got into it.

FYI this episode was a bit longer than episodes we normally have but I didn’t really want to edit much because I wanted you guys to just really truly hear the whole things. So here is my CTA to you guys. Check out this episode. Tell me if I did you guys justice. Tell me if you have any follow up questions what your thoughts are. This was spoken about a lot in our Facebook community and certainly amongst influencer marketing folks in general. I think it was because it’s not every day that you have a product from a small business featured in The New York Times. So I was excited to get to the bottom of it and learn all about this tool. And I hope you are too.

James your invitation is still very much on the table. We’d love to chat with you as well.

Jessy Grossman:

So Grace, this is your second time on the show, and I couldn’t be more happy to have you come back. So first and foremost, welcome back.

Grace Murray:
Thank you, Jessy. I’m very excited to be back. It’s always lovely to chat to you. And thanks for having me.

Jessy Grossman:
Oh my gosh, absolutely. This invitation back was always going to be extended to you but I guess came a little bit more quickly, just because we both are on a really fun Clubhouse chat, like less than a week ago. The room was our Breaking News Clubhouse, which is a regular room that we host, and you guys at Fohr have this incredible article that came out in The New York Times of all places. So congratulations on that.

The article was about AMP. There seems to be a lot of buzz and interest and intrigue about it. We’re going to dive all into that during our convo today. And but before we get into get down to business, I always love having our listeners get to know you. I’ve been fortunate to get to know you since you know our last conversation and a bit more beyond that. I would love for us to go through some ‘get to know you’ questions just so our listeners can get to know you, Grace, beyond the business professional. So are you ready for some rapid fire ‘get to know you’ questions?

Grace Murray:
I think so.

Jessy Grossman:
Amazing. We’re just gonna go into it. Are you ready?

Grace Murray:
Rapid response. Here we go.

Jessy Grossman:
Amazing. Grace, what is your favorite vacation spot?

Grace Murray:
Oh San Miguel, Mexico. It’s perfect. It’s up in the mountains. It’s I’ve only been once but I’m hoping that I can get married. It’s pretty small. But it’s just like the most beautiful place you’ve ever seen. It’s unreal. And people are incredible. The food’s incredible. Yeah, that’s my number one.

Jessy Grossman:
What is the best age to be?

Grace Murray:
On this age today? I’m going to say for me right now. I was very I’m 31. I was initially quite nervous about turning 30. And then as soon as I turned 30, I felt really like, oh, okay, this is great. I don’t have to now worry about all the things that I worried about in my 20s. I have a strongest sense of who I am. There’s so much excitement ahead of me. All of the women in my life that I look up to the vast majority of them are older than me. And I yeah, I think it’s a really I think the kind of 30s just seemed to me where it’s at. I also just joking to friends that you know, you know, you’re getting all the when you start saying like 30s, and you 20 or 40 is the new 30 or 50 is the new 40. But it’s it’s funny that I think that happens to everyone, or hopefully it happens to a lot of people, but I am. Yeah, I love I love being on this age.

Jessy Grossman:
I love that today, the best age to be is right now that’s the best. What is your biggest motivation in life?

Grace Murray:
Oh, that’s a big question. I’ve been thinking a lot about motivation recently. I would say, maybe being looked up to, and I want to, you know, I want to be in any sense. But I find that the most motivating if I have a sense of setting a good example, or teaching someone something or being there for them in some way or you know, showing that my career path hasn’t necessarily been the most linear or traditional and that a lot can come from hard work and believing in yourself. And you know, I see so I would say that’s my biggest motivation personally and professionally.

Jessy Grossman:
And our last question, what makes you laugh the most?

Grace Murray:
I mean, memes i don’t know i have like a, I have a I have a whole folder that I’ve started in my saved collections on Instagram. My friend Nico actually is an amazing micro influencer who is really focused on like content consumption and sustainability and he’s also a big share of hilarious content. And he suggested that everyone start a folder in their Instagram of things that really, really make them laugh so that if they’re having a tough day, you know, whenever you’re having a tough moment that you have a place where you’re like, Okay, I have a surefire folder of things that I just cannot help myself at laughing at. So that’s a that’s his recommendation that I’m stealing but sharing that with everyone else, that it’s a, it’s a good thing to catalogue and to be able to have to come back to because especially after the year that we’ve all had I mean, laughter is truly the only way. So saved folder of funnies and yeah.

Jessy Grossman:
I love it. That’s the best laughter is the best medicine. So absolutely have a folder reference back to. That’s the best. I love that so much. So I would have loved getting to know you. I feel like we got to know you even more, which is fantastic. And we’re gonna get to know you even more during the rest of our chat today. I like I mentioned, we have this New York Times article that came out. What would you say? Like two weeks ago or so perhaps?

Grace Murray:
Yeah. Two weeks ago? Yeah. And it was in the the printed Sunday Times last weekend. So I bought five from 711. So it’s been about two weeks now. It’s really exciting.

Jessy Grossman:
That’s amazing. So first and foremost, like, how did that article come to be?

Grace Murray:
Yeah, absolutely. So I mean, Taylor Lorenz wrote the article, who, for anyone who’s listening who isn’t familiar with her work, but as in the industry, I would highly, highly recommend getting into it. And she is, you know, one of the more I’d say respected and precise technology reporters and social media reporters out there. And so really, it came from, you know, us, essentially, reaching out and talking about, you know, the ways what we think and can do for the future of influences. And it is very much a future facing product of where we think the industry is shifting toward, and ultimately the impact that it can potentially have on culture and how opportunities are shared in the industry. And so, you know, I think the fact that it the way that we think about it is very much about the direction that the industry is heading and that it’s something that she’s really passionate about to have like how you know, there’s so much that happens under the hood of like, how are these deals? How do they come to bait? Who makes those decisions? You know, I feel like you’ve referenced our Clubhouse chat from last week. And I feel like every day I’m on clubhouse hearing a conversation about how does it work? Like how do brands find influencers? How do they select them? Where can I go to pitch them? How does that all work. And so you know, the hope with this product, and the future of it is that it can kind of start to give brands a place to be able to be more transparent about that, or at least have a place where they can send people to kind of knock on the door and say, this is where you apply if you want to be working with us. So that’s ultimately how it came to be. And, you know, I think Taylor knows everyone in the industry, it seems because she’s so ingrained in internet culture and, you know, the movements of the industry and the shifts and the changes, she was actually on that fake famous documentary that I’m sure you saw and that we all saw. So yeah, she’s just an incredible reporter and someone who, whose point of view I’m always just so interested in.

Jessy Grossman:
What do you think was her major takeaway from her discussions with you guys?

Grace Murray:
Um, I mean, I guess what was in the article, hopefully, which was basically just that, you know, I think the industry is an interesting one in that, you know, there are talent agencies, there are platforms like the core Fohr platform. There’s platforms like the actual social media networks themselves and they increasingly have their own you know, teams to be facilitating influencer partnerships. TikTok are doing the same thing where they are facilitating a lot of partnerships directly. You know, sometimes influences or reaching out on dm sometimes that works. Sometimes it doesn’t. But there’s just so many different modes of working. And so I think and I hope her major takeaway from that conversation was, it’s important for brands to think about the future of their programs, and also their customer base of, you know, how do you with the rise of nano influencers and brands increasingly looking to a program structure that goes right from mega down to real customers. How do you have your own platform as a brand that you can continue to drive people toward, so it is about your brand and the partnerships that you are cultivating. So in a lot of ways, AMP is kind of separate. AMP is separate to for its technology that we build, but we build it and then put it in the hands of our brands. And the hope again, there is that being that it is a an application model, that brands can say, Hey, this is where you go to work with us. This is where the pool that we’re going to be looking to. And I think, and again, I hope that her major takeaway was this is something that could be really good for the future of the industry, because it is brands taking on more direct access to the people that they can potentially work with and the stories behind why that person should be the exact fit for their brand.

Stephanie Carson
I’m Stephanie Carson, co-host of the entreprenitas podcast. Every week, my co-host Courtney Spritzer and I speak with inspiring female founders and leaders about how they built and scale their businesses, embrace failure, and have celebrated their successes. These women share their unfiltered views about what it takes to be your own boss. And spoiler alert, it may not be as glamorous as it looks on Instagram. You will hear the stories from some of the top female led brands including Urban Decay, Rebecca Minkoff, Lively and BeautyCounter. Subscribe to the entreprenitas podcast on Apple podcast, or wherever you listen to podcasts, or sign up to get episodes straight to your email inbox at entreprenIsta.com. You can also join our Instagram community and follow us for daily business inspiration at entrepreneur he says that’s E n t r e p r e n i s t a s. This will be the most fun business meeting you’ll ever have.

Jessy Grossman:
And so talk to us then a little bit about like the brand’s experience. So are they exclude… like if people are reaching out to a brand that’s on the platform. I think like the New York Times article reference, like Dyson is one of many examples of brands that are on the platform like if an influencer reach dmws Dyson, are they going to point those influencers to AMP? And then what is the… what is the brand’s experience? And how are they vetting and going through and deciding upon who to hire from the influencers that submit themselves?

Grace Murray:
Definitely, great question. So I think this is where there’s potentially some confusion as well, in that, AMP isn’t one central platform. So basically, every brand has their own. And so in theory, you know, I’m a brand, I sign up for AMP tomorrow. I sign in, and there’s no one in there. So, you know, you could also buy a Fohr core platform subscription, as well. And in that’s where influences have been signing up to for years now. And there’s, I think, close to 150,000 people in that network. But if you’re signing up to, if you’re a brand and you’re signing on to build out your own, and on day one, there’s not going to be anyone in there. So the experience for the brand does vary brand to brand, because of course a strategy for each brand varies. But the experience for them is kind of thinking through Okay, you know, what information do we really wish we knew about people before working with them. So you know, as an example, you referenced Dyson, like they might want to know if you have allergies as an example, because they have air purifiers as one of their core products. So that’s a piece of information that’s really hard to get at scale if you’re trying to select influences without having that be a part of the application. So for you know, for David’s bridal, it could be are you currently engaged? Are you planning an engagement? Are you a wedding photographer, you know, why are you hear basically so any of that information that is custom to that brand? That is in the onboarding phase for them. We talked to them and they’re there. Times about what do you wish you knew? What information do you need specific to your brand that can be filterable. For other brands, its hair type, or skin concerns. And so the initial onboarding process is really figuring out what are you hoping to gather from this? What information? Again, looking at the next couple of years of your influencer programs, what do you need to be retrieving from people in the upfront? And how can we build that into the platform. So that is the initial setup phase. Now, when people do dm, as you referenced, right, I think that’s one of the key problems that this product is solving is that I’m sure you’re no stranger to this, that influencer marketing is often in very different departments, depending on the company that you’re working with. So sometimes it’s an econ department. Sometimes it’s digital, sometimes it’s social, sometimes it’s a specific influencer marketing team. Very frequently, I would say, 90% 99% of the time, honestly, in really large companies. The person who’s managing the social account is not the person who is selecting influences for partnerships. And while it works, in some instances, today, I’m a brand and they’ll that very kind and generous with their time Social Media Manager will connect you to the right person. I’ve witnessed a lot of conversations where the right person will say, well, please don’t connect me until I confirm that I need to be connected, because I don’t want to open up a conversation, if we don’t have a relevant opportunity right now. I don’t want to, you know, disappoint someone if they feel if they’re getting connected to the right person. And then again, we’re just not ready to activate with them. And now I’ve opened a conversation and I have to get on the phone and all of these things. So there’s a really fractured space, where influences who are really proactive and business minded and eager to get in contact with the right person and to pitch them can’t actually get there because they are talking to the wrong person and the public facing social manager is not the one making those decisions. So the hope with AMP is that we’re giving our clients a place for that social manager to say, I can’t connect you with the right person right now, because I’m not privy to whether or not we have relevant opportunities, but you can go to the right place. So here is the place to go to, and the right person is going to be achieved retrieving information from that place. So the analogy that I’ve been using is that it’s really… it’s not necessarily a product that is immediately a connector, but it is, again, showing you where the door is to knock on and say, I want to be in the consideration set, I’m raising my hand, and I’m able to put my best foot forward because I have this opportunity to share what I love about your brand specifically, and why I would be a good fit.

Jessy Grossman:
And so a follow up question to you would be, you know, I heard a bit about the product being described, solving the problem, that it’s too much of a hoodoo, you know, type industry, and trying to sort of like open it up and have more inclusivity and accessibility really. So my question is, how are you guys cultivating relationships encouraging relationships to occur? Since it sounds like it’s, you know, it’s still at the end of the day is a platform? How are you solving that relationship? Problem?

Grace Murray:
Yeah, that’s a great question. I think. So I think first and foremost, I would say that it is a product, right? It’s a product and a tool that our wonderful human clients can then determine how does this help me be better in my relationship management. So in us, you know, in the brands, essentially licensing this technology and building out their own networks, the experience and what it’s arming them with there is information from those applicants or from those influences about their point of view and their interest in the brand specifically, so that then when the brand team member wants to reach out to those individuals and say, Hey, I’d love to open up the conversation, we might have an opportunity here. There’s already some shared information that can kick that off from a place of, we already know you’re really interested in the brand. And honestly, I think the really exciting thing about it is that there is excitement from the brands to then reach out. It’s less of a feeling of just a business transaction and more of one of like, Oh, wow. Like, we, you know, we saw in your application questions that you have this amazing story about having used this product for the last couple of years, we would love to open up a conversation, because we’re building out our ambassador program right now. And it’s really important to us that people are actually, you know, fans of our products, and you have an existing story. So let’s kind of open up a conversation. So I think that from a relationship standpoint, is what’s special about it is that it is for the brands to, customize and to give… to arm themselves with the information that they need to be able to jump off from a place where, you know, it is specific to that person, I think we are operating in an industry where there’s so much of a lean toward, like, Oh, this influencer could work for this thing, or this person could work for this thing. So I’m just going to reach out to them and, you know, kind of trade influencer A and influencer B as somewhat interchangeable. But I think the information that brands are able to gather through this technology means that they are… when they’re opening that conversation coming at it from a place of more excitement, and more, you know, more of more inspiration around what the possibilities could be, instead of it feeling like okay, I’m the brand and I have to educate you on what the product is and what our key messages are. And I have to come up with the messaging and I’m going to hold the reins really tight. I think it shifts the dynamic a little bit and has the brand’s wheels churning of like, Oh, I’m already saying this point, this person’s point of view before I even talked to them, because they’ve already given me a couple little nuggets about why they’re interested in our products. Or they’ve already said again, like a snapshot, one sentence late into a story about the fact that they’ve been using these products for years or that they’re excited to they would love to get this product for this reason, or that they’re getting married and they would love to, you know, potentially collaborate there. It shifts the dynamic and hopefully, arms the brands with more substantial, meaningful and human information to be able to kick those relationships off with. So ultimately, is technology but the hope, again, is that it allows brands to manage these relationships directly in a meaningful and effective way.

Jessy Grossman:
And that’s great. And, you know, idealistically that works right and like idealistically, like that’s a piece of it. It’s not even idealistically, like there’s a piece of it that like yeah, brands really should know that those influencers are genuinely interested in that product. But isn’t that just a piece of it? Because the you know, they’re not really just looking to sell one product to that influencer. They’re looking to sell hopefully thousands of products to their audience. And so is there a way that AMP helps clarify that piece of it as well to know that, you know, in addition to that one influencer, being enthusiastic about that product. That their audience is also going to be enthusiastic about that product. What’s already built in place, and maybe like, what’s on your roadmap in order to help facilitate that piece?

Grace Murray:
Yeah, I mean, I think that, to me, a big piece of getting anyone excited about anything is being excited about it yourself, right? And it’s about stories, it’s about… I know the word that we all use overuse drink every time you say authenticity, but thinking about what is or like, what we never unpack what the word authenticity means in influencer partnerships. Everyone always just says it has to be authentic, it has to be authentic, but how can it be authentic and what build up to authenticity. What is like the anatomy of authenticity. And to me, a huge piece of the anatomy of authenticity is it’s excitement. It’s having an existing narrative that your audience are familiar with that maybe a product or brand could fit into so it doesn’t even have to necessarily be that you have existing brand love for a product it could be that again, you’re getting married and maybe there’s a you know your audience for their for the proposal or for the story that like to say that love story come to a place and now you’re about to get married. Going to brand can be a part of that, because there’s that existing narrative there. Another piece of that kind of anatomy of authenticity is potentially brand love. So if it’s something that, you know, you’re, I know personally that the people that I follow, if I see them working with a brand, that either just really makes sense with them because of what they’ve been talking about already, or that they’ve organically mentioned that brand in the past, or really liked it, or even if they hadn’t mentioned it, but they’ve said, they’ve got a sincere story that they can tell about it, and they can inject themselves into it. That’s when I find that authenticity piece really coming through and being ultimately really persuasive. Because I think without that injection of self into sponsored content, sponsored content risks, just feeling like, you know, here’s everything that the brand wants you to say, because they’re driving the messaging instead of you bringing more of yourself to that. So I think that… I think, you know, having that interest in working with brands and raising your hand and saying, hey, I’ve got either an idea or specific motivation as to why I’m reaching out to you is, to me, a huge piece of audiences being interested in having having the content resonate. Because it’s, it is just ultimately grounded in, in human emotion, and human interest. And, you know, we can all tell when someone isn’t actually interested in a partnership, or that it isn’t something that they really care about and audiences know that.

Jessy Grossman:
Can I challenge you on that for one sec?

Grace Murray:
Yeah. Go for it.

Jessy Grossman:
Can you always… can you always like I, you know, look, I like to keep it as real as possible on this podcast. And like, I also, like, I’m an idealist at heart too. So I would love to marry the two but I also just want to like solve these problems more than anything. I have personally worked with influencers, let’s be really real, who would absolutely take a paycheck over like anything, and this is a business for them. And money and making, you know, six figure plus income is can be like addictive, to be honest, by a lot of influencers, you know, like, these people, some of these people on like TikTok, or some of these, like younger, you know, influencers, they’ve never had another job in their life like, and all the sudden, they are getting all this traction and notoriety and fame and money. And so you know, like, yes, from a brand’s perspective, I think that like, all of these things are really important. A hundred percent the brand wants to know that these influencers are genuine about the product, or do they just want to sell product, and they and they just want it to feel genuine enough? And are influencers experienced enough that they’re just expert sales people, and as long as they make it appear as if it’s the best product or cool enough, or whatever the case may be itself. So I just, you know, I, I wonder this I wonder, is there a way there might be and I don’t know what the answer is, but is there a way to ensure that influencers aren’t just applying because they want a paycheck? And I’d love to, I guess, maybe get a glimpse into what does that influencer application actually look like?

Grace Murray:
Yeah.

Jessy Grossman:
Let’s talk about that. Because I’d love to sort of get a glimpse behind the scenes.

Grace Murray:
I actually love this question. for a lot of reasons. I think the first thing that this tells me as well is that. Again, I’m an idealist. I think we’ve all had, like, a weird year, and I have somehow managed to make literally everything about emotion and about connection. And as I just said to you, and I pray cool. You know, I cried in an Airbnb last night. So like, what the hell is going on here. But if we swing away from that, right, and go toward thinking of influences as really effective salespeople, which I, I was in sales for years, and I have a huge amount of respect to sales. And it’s a again, sales is about not as much about emotion. It is in some ways, and it’s about human psychology. And there are a huge amount of influences who are out there who are incredibly effective at delivering a persuasive message, which does still incorporate a level of themselves and their experience in the way that they talk to their audience and including a call-to-action and all of those things, right? So let’s think about it then like this, if we reframe what AMP is and what it does. As if you have two people applying to a job, and one of those people in their application or in their interview, like, I just love this company. I love it so much. I’ve always looked up to what you do, and I love it, I love it, I love it. And, you know, I think I would be so great here, just because I’m so passionate about the company and what you do and your mission and may fitting into that. That’s one route. And that’s one application, you have another application from someone who is like, you know, what, I don’t have a lot of experience with your company, or a lot of knowledge on what it does or what it’s about. But I’m incredibly effective at what I do. I have all of this proof of that. I am going to bring a level of professionalism and, you know, performance and insights to your team that you are just frankly not even ready for. And you know, then the brain, it’s up to that employer to say, well, do I want this person who’s hugely passionate, but maybe not as experienced? Or do I want this person who’s really answering a lot of my potential concerns about what this potential role could look like? And I would say a lot of employers would maybe go with the person who said, Hey, here’s my selling point. Like, it’s not just about passion, it’s not just about love. It’s about all these other things. And I think and does that because basically, the… you know, again, it should just be thought about as a way to apply in a way to raise your hand and the way to say like, Hey, this is me, just showing that I’m interested in working with you all. The onboarding for an influencer, or that application is you are connecting your account to AMP for that brand, specifically, and no one else to be able to track and save your content. So they can search it and see what you’re talking about. So, you know, if Jessy, you sign up to, you know, David’s Bridles AMP, tomorrow, that wouldn’t then put you in the for platform, and it wouldn’t put you in any other platform. In that process, you would answer those. So you connect your account, it’s, uh, you know, typically, there’s around three custom filters for that brand of like, again, are you planning engagement? Are you not? Are you? Or do you have allergies? What’s your hair type, whatever is important to that brand. And then there are optional questions from that brand. And there’s usually between one and five questions, and you can ultimately complete your application without answering those questions. But in some ways, it’s kind of like applying for a job without submitting a cover letter, if that makes sense. So I think in those questions, again, those are custom to the brand. So whatever they want to know. But typically, they’re pretty high level of like, I should, like do have existing experience with our products or our brand. I would say is a pretty common one, because it is broad enough that people can give that information. And then another really common one is just, you know, why? Why should we work with you? And I think again, those answers that are more in the effectiveness and sales and professionalism and motivation and bucket. I think those are just as if not better answers than, hey, I have this story for this product. So I actually really love that question. Because I think that is helpful push back to be able to think about, think about and take back to our attainments, like, you know, we’re talking about this from a place of, you know, exclusively brand love, really, but to me, it’s more about giving people the opportunity to say, Hey, I’m interested in working with you, for whatever reason, and removing the dynamic that exists in so many industries of which, you know, people don’t even advertise jobs, they just hire who they know, and from their own networks, and we have absolutely been guilty of that. And that’s something that we’re very conscious of now, because of understanding how a hiring bias can kind of manifest just through lack of paying attention to it of saying, Hey, we have an open position or I know someone who could be great. Let’s bring them in and not have advertising that position. So I think the hope with this and why there has been conversation about it. Being a fair way of approaching is that if you look at the influence industry that is still held a lot of it is operating, it’s, you know, a lot of people even, maybe not even going to a platform or an agent or anyone and just instead thinking, who do I already know, that I think would work for this opportunity. And that’s something that we are just more conscious of than ever. And I think it is ultimately a problem in the industry that this could help solve.

Jessy Grossman:
So that’s like, I don’t know, I feel like that’s what resonates with me the most is the part about it opening up, it’s like online dating.

Grace Murray:
Yeah.

Jessy Grossman:
And literally, it’s, it sounds to me as if like, that’s where some real value really resonates with me, where you would just come into contact with influencers that you may never have before. But it’s bringing… it’s a it’s the conduit to bring people together, that might be a great match for each other. I think like, I would love to see as you guys continue to develop this and explore this great potential platform to see like stats on like, okay, so like, from these brands, how many people did they end up hiring that weren’t on their radar before? And it was simply because of AMP. And that introduction there? And, you know, the influencers who are landing those deals. What does the… What do their applications look like? Do they question do they have the ability, the influencers to submit, you know, screenshots or images, or does it all text based on the application.

Grace Murray:
So it’s pretty, we’ve kept it pretty light in terms of the application, because we don’t want to create a user experience where anyone feels like it’s really laborious to go through an application. Because you know, some brands might have… might be really popular, and they will post about it on their social or they’ll drive a lot of interest. And so we wanted to keep the lift, pretty light. So for right now it’s just, it’s very text based and entering those custom questions. But you could definitely be linking out to another document or a post that was a good example or anything like that. So the lift right now is consciously light for anyone to sign up to an AMP. And all of them are obviously free signups. It’s something that should only take a couple of minutes. And that hopefully, you know, isn’t something where people feel like, oh, what, what does my application need to include? Or what does it need to look like? Because I think to that, it’s back to our conversation before about this helping with relationships. But I would, I would stand to bet that, you know, a lot of… a lot of brands are not going to just be looking at an application and saying, okay, that’s the person. Like, it’s brief enough and large enough, that it’s just enough to pique their interest to say, oh, wow, that was like, this person sounds great. I want to talk to them, or I want to talk to their manager, or I want to talk to their agent. And so I, I don’t think it’ll ever be a type of a scenario where, you know, you just look at it, and then it’s like, okay, as with any hiring, right, it’s like, look at the resume and look at the cover letter and say done deal. It’s definitely not that type of an approach, it’s more, hey, here’s a little something about me that might pique your interest is the brand. Fingers crossed, and then hopefully, they reach out and go for it. But I totally agree with you, I mean, case studies for the for the future, and what we are able to share from the way that our brands are using it would be awesome for us. And I think the challenge there, but also the strength of the platform in a lot of ways is that so much of this, you know, we’ve deliberately not built, for example, on platform messaging, because we do think that those interactions should be private, those negotiations should be private, and those relationships should be kept private. So we really have to lean on our clients to say, give us the good stuff, what can we include in our case studies here. And we you know, we of course, have usage, stats on how many profiles they’re viewing and all that sort of thing, but the actual facilitation of those conversations, and that connection between the two parties is something that we want to still keep private between both, which is also how The Fohr platform is built. In that when you’re reaching out to someone you’re reaching out to them on email, it’s not on the platform, because we don’t want those those conversations to be, you know, broadly accessible or to add another inbox to all of our, to our life of many inboxes. So that’s the thinking there behind keeping those communications between the brands and the influences directly.

Jessy Grossman:
Yeah, and I think that like keeping them personal totally makes sense. I think that like, like anything, you know, the more success stories that you can hear and like the data and analytics would be really helpful. Is this and is the tool? Is it whitelisted? For the brand? Or It is? Yeah,

Grace Murray:
It is. So when I think that’s the other thing that is important for everyone to know, is that.

Jessy Grossman:
And when I say whitelisted, I actually went white labeled. White labeling.

Grace Murray:
I’ve actually Well, there you go, were connected, because I knew exactly what you meant. Yes, that’s a very important thing. I’m glad you brought it up, because none of the AMPs, which it stands for Ambassador Management Platform, and was an internal name, but we just stuck with it, because it just stuck. And we’re all you know, throwing around, we had like a T-shirt designed internally that’s that says amped in like crazy 80s lettering, and it just kind of stuck. But it is white labeled for brands. So it doesn’t actually, you know, if you’re a brand and you have an AMP, the goal is that it it, it doesn’t actually look like for it or it looks how you want it to look, because it’s about you and your brand. And you know, when influencers go to it, they should land on it, and say, Oh, this is where this brand is inviting people to sign up to say that they’d be interested in working with them. And for actually isn’t listed on those pages at all. So you know, as an example, it’s very similar to like Bumble and not a client. But there’s someone who I would love to be a client, because they have for a long time already had this type of a system, but it’s just that they’re running it through Google Forms currently. So on their website, they have an ambassador’s tab, you can say I want to sign up to be an ambassador. And then you go through a series of questions of saying, Are you looking to be a college Ambassador? Are you looking to be a paid Ambassador? Are you a success story? And they’re just aggregating all of that in Google Forms. But the added value of AMP is that through connecting your account, Bumble could then say, okay, maybe we don’t have an opportunity for you right now. But you’ve connected your account. And in a couple of months, we’ve seen that your followings grown or that you’ve organically mentioned us, or maybe we just have an opportunity now that we didn’t have a few months ago. And we’re able to say, you know, your analytics and stats from that time. So yeah, it’s a that’s a roundabout way of saying yes, that it is white labeled. And the goal is for brands to really see themselves in it and to have a place again, where consumers can go and influencers can go and not be confused of like, wait, I thought I just reached out to, you know, Costco and Instagram and asked where I could, who I could be connected to, and they sent me to this Fohr page, that doesn’t make any sense. So it’s, you know, sending them over to a destination online that looks and feels like the brand.

Jessy Grossman:
So it’s a technology. P it’s a piece of technology.

Grace Murray:
Yeah, yeah, absolutely.

Jessy Grossman:
It sounds like first and foremost. And it’s white labeled, not whitelisted. White labeled, which is great, I’m sure for brands to know and hear. And then you know, are you guys also simultaneously offering the ability to advise and consult these brands? In addition? Or, you know, or are you also offering to then go through those listings and suggest people they should work with? Or even you know, they’re like, Alright, well, what do you suggest are my intake questions? How do you what do you suggest I see looks like, you know, are is there more hand holding involved?

Grace Murray:
Definitely. So as you know, with the timespace, it only actually publicly launched a couple of weeks ago. But our building of this product was very much informed by brands who had said to us, this is like the type of thing that we’re looking for, that we haven’t really been able to find on the market. And are saying all this is something that we’ve been wanting to build, but we really want to build it out in a way that actually makes sense for real use cases and brands and how they’re using them in their workflows. So as part of that kind of beta group, and the testing that we have gone through with them, it’s been, you know, very clear that in the onboarding that’s needed for this product. Right now, there’s two core sessions, if you’re just signing up to AMP and you’re not signing up for additional managed or strategic services, is to, you know, the hourish long sessions with a customer service representative will take you through, you know, prompting questions of like. What is important to you? What would be your ideal filter, if you could jump in there and find it immediately. But part of those conversations is, of course, if a brand says, Well, we want these 20 questions, and our team, you know, providing that expertise to say, well, from a user experience standpoint, that’s going to probably make this a pretty laborious application to go through, and you’ll experience some drop off. So let’s keep that light. So there’s definitely those two sessions there for kind of talking through. What their use cases are?What problems they’re trying to solve? And what teams this is going to that there’s this, you know, tool and these tools are going to be helping, is it value getting this exclusively because you do want to bridge that gap between your social team and your influencer team? Is it that you have a huge amount of people who are interested in working with you, and you don’t have a way of organizing them? Is it that you have really custom criteria that you’re wanting to announce about PayPal? So there’s a couple of different use cases and that’s a part of the setup. And so once they’re set up, they do then have access to a level of support, but it’s quite light, it’s you know, a, you know, you have an account manager who is there for questions, is there for just, you know, light touch, we’re not sure about this, can you give us a refresh on how this product works. But then, there is, of course, the opportunity for brands to also say, we want to build this out. But we also want you to help us take the next step then of like, what do we do once we have all of these people in hand? So I’d say there’s two camps, right? There’s the ones who are using this technology, because they’re building out their teams internally, and they want to have their own pool or community of potential influences or ambassadors to work with. And then there’s another who are like, Okay, this sounds really great. We still don’t have the bandwidth to be running our own campaigns directly. How can we? How can we have access to AMP while also having your team be the ones to make those recommendations. And that’s only just started happening, but it’s really exciting. And that’s where my experience that I spoke to you before of saying the excitement from the brands comes in that when we’re sending over recommendations, we’re not just saying, you know, they have an engagement rate of this, and their average rate is this and they’ve grown and their stats, their stats are stats. And here’s like a high level sentence on who they are. It’s so powerful to be able to go to a brand and say, look at this really compelling answer from someone. where, you know, there was one that I read the other day for, Oxo ware, which is a kitchen and appliances. Well, not just kitchen, they have a lot of home products, you probably have some in your drawers, everyone does. They’re sold at Bed, Bath and Beyond in a bunch of other places. But the answer was just from this woman who is basically saying, these products are already in my life, my or my audience is already saying them, I have never been able to work with you. And I would love to take this to the next level and be able to, you know, work with you in a larger capacity. And it was a very, it was kind of a balance of the two types of answers that we spoke through before of like having some brand loves, but also talking about this as a business proposition. And to be able to include that in our recommendation and say, this person seems like they’re going to be great as a partner. You know, we’re looking for longer term people. There’s already the dynamic there for having applied. She has given us some really strong nuggets of information about the products that she likes but she’s also said, Hey, I am, you know, professional, I am going to deliver. And it made it really exciting to be able to show the brands and for them, then I think this also can potentially be a helpful thing for the industry long term because it gives them something that they can go to their boss with and get their boss excited about. And I think so frequently the industry is, as you know, I think we all have this frustration in the WIIM group. I think the industry is really underestimated. And that these stories can be really helpful in evangelizing what is possible with influencers and ambassadors and how meaningful these partnerships can be.

Jessy Grossman:
I love that and then I think it’s important. I mean, I definitely want to make sure that we like touch on the brand’s experience because you know, we’re a group Mostly for that side of the industry. But I’m also so aware in that Clubhouse that we were in it together and this podcast even there are a ton of influencers, even listening. And I feel like from their perspective, there, there’s been some questions as well like clarifications that they would love to have. So from your core product that’s been around for a long time, you’ve said if there’s like over 100,000 influencers on there, I feel like from this conversation, I have a pretty good sense of how they are different. Like you said, in an AMP like, there’s no influencers that are in there on day one. This is something that is you know, the influencers going and applying to them. But they would, would they link their social platforms into AMP?

Grace Murray:
Yes, they would. And I think the core difference there, and I can go more into detail as well. But the core difference there is that you’re linking it just for that brand. So it’s not that accessible to for to any other AMPs. It’s just for that brand. So if you’re someone who doesn’t want to connect to a platform, but you have a long standing interest in working with one brand, specifically. That’s part of the terms of service for influences and the protection there that you know that your your data is only being shared with that one brand. And again, you’re connecting to it, you’re opting into it. So it’s an opt in module. But sorry, Jessy, I feel like I cut you off there at the end. Or I can jump into if you like, the difference between the core differences between Fohr and AMP?

Jessy Grossman:
Yeah, no, no, no, you didn’t cut me off. I appreciate that. But no, I know. It’s cool. I so I asked, you know, yeah, so that piece of it feels clear. And I appreciate the clarifications. And then, I guess one question I’ve heard a lot is great. That sounds awesome. I love that brand. How do I find their AMP? How do I how do I apply? Where do I go?

Grace Murray:
Definitely. So this is the hot question, you know, again, brands in the process, given it is so new, of determining where and how they can promote it, which again, does impact multiple teams. So with the example of our ultimate goal, and our ultimate hope, and ultimate vision of the product is that brands do have that tab on their on their website to say, you know, you’ve got your Careers tab, and you’ve got your Ambassadors tab, and that it will be as clear and simple as that. Of course, we all know how complex some of these brands and companies are. So for a lot of them, it’s not at that place yet it is in a place where their team has this product, they’re still working through how it ties into their strategy, they know it’s a need for them. And you know, they are using it as a direct as a destination to send their audience or their influences when they’re reaching out to them directly. Some of them have already posted it on social. So that’s another way that brands are promoting it. There’s other brands that we’ve been talking to who are wanting to email it out to everyone who’s ever who either they’ve ever worked with or that they do want to work with. And other brands are essentially trying to recruit people into it. So like through the Fohr platforms, so they could reach out to you and say we are selecting our talent from our AMP. And if you’re interested, because we’ve seen that you’ve posted about the brand, you could sign up. So that’s again, a multi pronged answer. But the hope is that brands will have this on their website. The vast majority are planning to either post it on their posted on their social to kind of alert everyone to it. And as far as I know, the vast majority are already using this as the destination to send people when they are reaching out either through dm or email or any other form of kind of proactive pitching.

Jessy Grossman:
And I totally get and appreciate early phases. A new product or a new company or whatever I’m trying to like figure out these logistics. The feedback that I could give you would that I feel like people would really appreciate is what we were talking about towards the beginning of this conversation about Oh, like accessibility, like there’s something to that, you know, we’re trying to solve the problem of you know, it’s all about who you know, and the accessibility is there. That’s so key. I’d be such a huge thing. And so that next piece could really should really be solved, which is like, wonderful. Like, that’s the premise of this. It sounds like I am on board with that. But I can’t find it or I don’t know where to go. No, I. yeah,

Grace Murray:
Yeah, absolutely. And I think as you said, that’s a an early days type of a scenario. And I also think, again, you know, our hope is that as many brands as possible can have this type of technology. But I think even if, even if and when it’s not through us, I do think that this is just the direction that the industry is moving, where brands made NATO, why have of NATO destination or a clear place to be able to say, Hey, this is where you apply? Again, back to that analogy of just if you only hired people in your own network and never posted a job listing? So.

Jessy Grossman:
You know, it’d be you know, it’d be amazing. The last time you were on our podcast, you were talking about ambassadorships. That’s so much of what we’re talking about. And I agree with you anything so many people do. I, we talked about this a lot in WIIM and I want to empower you guys and every other brand or agency listening is to like, Be the change you want to see. Right? Like, is there an opportunity in your contract with the brand to say, like, our requirement is that this is listed on our website, at the very least, like Fohr’s website, perhaps at the very least, so that there’s a place that all influencers can go and know where to apply. And absolutely, brands might be inundated with all of these inquiries, and I get the that side of it, where it’s like, no, we’re trying to avoid that, or we’re trying to do it in a particular way. But like, if the message is accessibility, it’s got to be more accessible, right. And I, and again, like, I hear you and I appreciate that, like early stages of anything, like of course, there are these like things that you’ve got to work out. And you know, I have full faith that you guys will work that out. So what it’s worth, like, that would be so key and so wonderful to see from the influencers perspective.

Grace Murray:
Yeah, absolutely. And I think too, because of that challenge of us, always being white labeled and of Fohr not being present on them. It is something that we do want to work toward of having a place where you can see all of them visible. And I think, to your point, some brands would redline that immediately, others wouldn’t. But that’s something that, you know, our team is already chatting through up just like how do we how do we share these more broadly, so more people can see them. And I think that is a place that we will get to for sure. It’s just a it’s ultimately it is like it is technology for these brands to be using independently. And the goal for them is to or the goal for I think the industry is to meet this need of having a place to be able to send people so I totally agree with that feedback. And that is that’s where we’ll get to so it’s all part of the process. Absolutely.

Jessy Grossman:
Totally, and I get you can’t put a gun to someone’s head and say do this, buy my product and do it my way. I get that but like, you know, again, like the… people all these brands are going to look to you guys for Fohr has literally been in the in like how long have you guys been in existence? What year did you open?

Grace Murray:
Like, eight, eight years?

Jessy Grossman:
Yeah.

Grace Murray:
And I think to that point, though, that’s a good segue, if I could have a little humble brag for a moment, is that, you know, we were as far as I’m aware, we were the first platform in the world for influences were pulling them blog is at that point. And you know, we have been we’ve Safar squad was the first large scale application based program. And a lot of this technology is built off some of the principles that we saw as being so magical in that program of seeing so many people apply that we just wouldn’t have been able to unearth had they not applied and that we wouldn’t have been able to see how perfect and how special their stories were for Safar because it was a part of that application. You know, I just used both of those examples of they were firsts from Fohr that we’re solving for problems that we had identified. And I think a big part of problem solving for future problems as well for a future facing issues is that it does, you know, it’s for them to be effective for the products to be effective and the approaches to be effective. There needs to be this kind of symbiotic relationship between the way that we’re building our products, and the They’re going to be using them. But it’s also important to have conversations like this right of like thinking through the application process. How to get there? What that feels like, if you get all this excitement, but then you can’t immediately jump in and like you hear of this great job, but you want to be able to go for it straightaway. So I think the only thing I would say there is, you know, bear with us, this is like an exciting, an exciting thing. It’s an exciting product. But outside of that, and again, outside of us, I think it is just an exciting time in the industry that this is something that brands are thinking about. And the thing that is really promising and motivating to us is that the conversations that we have with brands, when they you know, when we first started even thinking about this product have been so much about all we want. We want people to know where they can ask us to work with us. So we’ve those hand raisers of saying, yep, it’s me, where do we send them and right now, this is a product that can help sell for that, I think more products are going to pop up that also try and help to solve for that, or again, with a Bumble example of like, there are some brands who are already trying to handle this with Google shapes. But I think it is a better direction for the industry to be going in, rather than, you know, so many people behind the scenes trying to understand like, how does this work, it works so differently from brand to brand, company to company person to person events. So yeah, I hope that kind of gives some, some clarity and info there. But you know, it’s a, it’s an exciting time in the industry, for sure.

Jessy Grossman:
Hundred percent. I love a good technology saw that anyone who’s listened to the show knows that I’m like, a bit obsessed with that. So I love that you guys are, you know, very tech centric, I appreciate that your products always look good. And they function well, it’s really important in our industry, right? And, you know, times are changing, and we shouldn’t be using Google any, like Google suite to capture this important of information. So no, look, I think it’s very promising, or else there wouldn’t be a New York Times article about it, there wouldn’t be buzz around it. And, you know, you guys have been around long enough to have the insight to know what’s important. And I appreciate, even based on our last conversation, like ambassadorships shouldn’t, you know, should occur way more than just these one off, you know, siloed relationships that are so short lived. And, you know, I see, and then you guys build a platform that has ambassador in the name right, and, you know, perpetuating those ideas, I think is huge. I think that with, again, with any product that has any value, you’re gonna have to test and learn and get feedback. And so I appreciate that you guys seem open to it. And I have full faith that you’ll continue to develop it. And it’s great to just learn sort of what your specific goals are with this product. So we can just, you know, enjoy watching it grow and develop. So it’s exciting. And I appreciate you, and I appreciate you coming on the show today and to talk about it.

Grace Murray:
Of course. I have a question for you, too, if that’s okay.

Jessy Grossman:
Yeah, sure.

Grace Murray:
Yeah. So, I mean, I’m interested to know as well, from your perspective, and I know there’s so many conversations in the WIIM group about this. But when you are pitching brands or pitching agencies, how are you right now going about that is that you’re going to your existing network or the I guess the conversations and questions that you’re getting from the community that you’ve cultivated in WIIM. What are some of those kind of key pain points that you’re still feeling in terms of, you know, this process of trying to get in touch with the right person?

Jessy Grossman:
Yeah, absolutely. I think it’s a two, mainly two issues. One is, how do I find the right person to pitch to? And then, well, gosh, there’s probably way more than two issues and that’s one issue. The other issue is what is the right pitch look like? Like how do I make sure that I’m solving your problem and communicating the solve your problem? And then timing, timing is so huge. We hear from especially in a lot of our Clubhouse conversations lately from brands and agencies being like, you know, absolutely, I love managers pitches, I love influencer pitches, like please keep them coming. It’s good for me to have you top of mind and I will always add you to my list, whatever that list looks like. And to your point, it’s sort of all over the place. So that is, you know, an issue but But it’s rarely if ever, a Oh, you pitch me today, I’m gonna have a project for you tomorrow. It’s just never that. And so I think that a lot of it is having those conversations. So managers and influencers fully understand that because that seems to absolutely be the norm. When pitches happen, I, you know, my tried and true, like advice for people is, why are they a brand fit, but also why now. And so right now we’re recording this, and it’s mid March, this is time to pitch for Mother’s Day, and it might actually even be a little bit too late for a Mother’s Day pitch. And so it’s about hitting the timing, hitting the message solving the problem. And then also, of course, even just knowing who to reach out to, you know, LinkedIn has been fantastic. It’s a resource I usually recommend to people. But you know, all speak personally, WIIM is a huge resource for people, of course, to just connect with people in the industry and know who to connect with. And generally speaking, if you’re in WIIM, you know that it’s a networking organization. And so you’re open to networking. However, I’ll keep this anonymous, of course, but I literally got an email yesterday, from a member in the group. And she was concerned about privacy, because somebody reached out to her in the group about potentially working together. And I was like, well, we have a membership directory on our site, and you can opt out of, you know, having your information listed there. But of course, she didn’t know that. And her information was listed her email, and she got to reach out from someone in the group who wanted to network with her, and she felt like that was a little inappropriate. So, you know, it’s about connecting with the right person in a way that they’re sort of expecting that reach out. So AMP could solve that problem. I mean, you’re you’re creating this environment, that is the purpose of it. But yeah, you know, I those are, those are some of the huge issues that we talk about on a pretty regular basis.

Grace Murray:
Yeah. And I think I mean, that’s also, I think, just spot on with with some of the pain points that we feel even like pitching brands, to, you know, let us in on an RFP like, we’re like, please just let us even, you know, do this free work in this RFP, we’re so ready for it. But you’ve just, I think, hit the nail right on the head of what again, I think it’s just so fractured in the industry is that it, you have to be right place, right time and know the right person. And so like, for those stars to align is really difficult. And what happens when that person that you’ve spent all of this time courting in some way, if they then change positions, and you don’t now know if that company is like switching over to a new system, or how it’s all going to work. Another use case that I’ve been thinking about for AMP is, you know, hotels, and how inundated they are constantly with people reaching out and wanting to work with them. And I’ve had conversations with so many hotels, where they’re just like, Oh, we end up just not responding to people who are actively reaching out and instead, come to a company like you to identify people from scratch, and then go about it that way. When it’s like, right, but there’s all of these people wanting to work with you who are, you know, trying to plan vacations, trying to plan a trip to go and shoot content, trying to reach out for a paid collaboration, whatever it is. But because the opportunity timing, and the person doesn’t align, they just all of that interest, it just falls on deaf ears and hits a wall and thank you so much for your interest, I’ll pass it on to the right person, and often it doesn’t get passed along to the right person. So I think the hope is that with this tool, even if it’s not quite the right time, because who you know, you never know how far ahead a brand is planning are what they have coming up or what they don’t, but you’re at least getting into the right place. And whenever it is the right time, the brand, you know, you least have that kind of, you know, assurance that the brand is looking within that in that pool.

Jessy Grossman:
And that’s that’s so key. I mean that with any business especially like theFortune 500, Fortune 100 companies that you guys are working with, like there needs to be organization to this and there used to be valatie to this I need to be longevity to this And to your point like people change persistence all the time in this industry that is way, way more common than uncommon. And so yeah, absolutely. I mean that’s that’s a huge value add for sure, just to have it all in one place, and organized and hopefully like tagged and easily, like referenced and all of those things is super key from the brand’s perspective, absolutely. I think like the key is, you know, capturing the operative information. And from the influencers perspective, you know, being able to provide the to be educated, perhaps even on what makes the best pitch, and we’re talking about Clubhouse so much. And, you know, the conversations that happened on there, oh, my God, like, that is a conversation that happens on there all the time. And yeah, I’m always wondering, and managers too. And, you know, from the management perspective, and I know, you and I have talked about this a bit, too, it’s like, you know, my backgrounds in management. So I’m always going to be like, what’s the tool for the managers, though? Like, where are they in this equation? And I know, from a management perspective, it would be it’s like all these tools. And you know, there’s a ton of platforms out there that have like self service tools, they aren’t going to be so they’re just not necessarily going to have the time to submit their you know, even if it’s just 20 influencers, across 20 brands. It’s a hard sell. But if there was like a manager log in, where they can then go click, click, click, but I would you know, even to that point, you probably want to hear from the influencers themselves, you don’t want to hear from the managers on their behalf probably right.

Grace Murray:
Yeah, I mean, but that could be something that could eventually come in, you know, I mean, I know on our Fohr core platform, it also I keep saying core platform to just like, separate it, that’s not called Fohr core, but you know, our main Fohr platform. We did add the ability to note on your profile that you’re managed, and that you can add your managers contact details instead of your own. So that could, I mean, you know, that could be something that ends up being incorporated, because again, to our conversation before, which I loved of, you know, applicant A, applicant B and who’s going to be more effective. If you’re working with those larger influences, you know, you want a manager or an agent who is really on top of that shift as well. So to be able to see that application from an agent or manager, I think would be really compelling. And that could be something that is eventually Incorporated. And if I could just as a quick little tidbit on pitching because I think this is a tool that is free for influences on Fohr, and that is used really heavily by some people. But we haven’t done a great job of continuously promoting it and continuing to evangelize what you can do with it. But on your full profile, there’s a tab that says Content Search, and you can jump in there and search any word. So that could be a brand that you’re about to pitch, or it could be a brand and in the same category that you want to show, you know, I’m pitching a hotel, and I recently stayed at the four seasons. So I want to show them all of the content that I created in one place without having to put it into a custom deck. So you know, or it could be, again, that you’re showing that you’re frequently talking about a nade that their product is meeting. So maybe it’s that you have dry skin, and you’re pitching a skincare company about a moisturizer. And so you’re literally searching dry skin, whatever it is, you can use that tool unlimited, for free to be able to very quickly pull a summary. A summary page of all of that content related to that keyword. It’ll show how many impressions you generated and your engagement rate. But that can be a really low touch easy way of sending something to a brand that feels custom to them even though you didn’t have to put in a huge amount of time and energy into creating a custom deck for them. So that’s just a little tidbit of one of the free tools for influences. And you know, I mean ideally an agent login would be helpful Jessy and then you could be pulling that for your talent so you know that’s that’s just something that I think can be really helpful in pitching as well.

Jessy Grossman:
Yeah, that’s great. And I really I want to say that I so appreciate that about you guys. I hear from influencers a lot how you know Fohr provides me with this tool and that tool and you know, look like I’m so passionate about providing women in particular but just you know, people the ammunition that they need to just do good business. And so when I am hearing about Fohr this, Fohr that it usually includes that piece of the conversation, which is, you know, they’re like, oh check out Fohr because you can get this tool and it helps you and it helps you like pitch to brands or, you know, provide this information, that information, there’s educational pieces to it as well. And I sure I can speak on behalf of a lot of influencers where they’re super appreciative of those tools. So, you know, look, I hope that this is, this sounds like it’s, it’s a tool, really for the brand side. But they’re, you know, it’s really for both. It sounds like it’s there’s an opportunity, I don’t know, I keep equating it to like to online dating.

Grace Murray:
I love that. I love that analogy, too. It’s a match maker.

Jessy Grossman:
Yeah, it just, it seems like it’s the opportunity to meet people you wouldn’t otherwise meet, and you share a bit of information about each other and say why it’s a match. And then hopefully, the rest is history. So I love it. I hope that, you know, it remains also true to the name, which we discussed on our last chat on the show is, you know, the ambassadorship model, I really hope it, you know, the industry continues to go in that direction, I hope that you guys continue to champion that. I love that it’s in the name of this new tool. I love and appreciate that you guys are always open to feedback, and you know that you’re asking questions and if anyone has additional questions, whether it’s on the brand side or the you know, the influencer side. What’s the best way for them to reach out and connect with you guys?

Grace Murray:
Absolutely. So you can reach out to our Fohr team very easily. So there’s a sales at Fohr.co. You could reach out to me directly if you’d like. I’m grateful for that. And I mean, I would also I think Jessy, you and I have chatted about doing a Clubhouse soon or something like that, I think that it’d be great to to be able to, you know, to chat more about this. Because, again, to me, I think so many of the tools that we create are about the industry more broadly. And the things that we want to champion are about the industry more broadly. Something I’m really passionate about is that, you know, some of those tools that you just referenced that afraid for influences are helpful, whether it’s working with us or externally of us, because I think that the industry becoming stronger ultimately makes us all stronger, and paints a brighter future for all of us. So we’d love to hear from anyone who has questions or feedback or thoughts or ideas. So either of those, those email addresses are fine. And hopefully I’ll also see you on Clubhouse. My handle is Grace Murray. And it’s the same on Instagram. So I would love to connect with anyone listening and answer any questions you might have or just network with the wonderful community that is WIIM because I’ve been in that group now for I would say I mean, I don’t even know when you started at Jessy but I think probably since the beginning and it’s always just such a wealth of information and great conversations happening and you know, a little bit of a trend watch spot two of the questions and things that are popping up frequently. So loved being here, love chatting to you. And thanks again for having me.

Jessy Grossman:
Thanks for being here.

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